Becoming a Locavore: Introduction

Many of my German ancestors on my father’s side have been in Pennsylvania since the late 1700’s.  They were farmers who owned a lot of land and grew their own food.  I imagine that they were very self-sufficient.  My Italian ancestors on my mother’s side were also farmers, so you could say my love for food and growing my own runs in my blood.

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Just one example of farming in my ancestry.
FleisherMiller
A miller worked in a mill to process grains into flour.

It is because of my ancestors that I have decided to challenge myself to only eat what I can find locally.  The fad term for this is “locavore.”  Being a locavore became popular a few years ago, so I am behind the times as far as trends are concerned.

There are some very easy ways to start to become a locavore depending on the type of food you want to eat.

  1. Fruits and vegetables. I already participate in Strites’ Orchard CSA, so I have my fruits and vegetables covered.  Other vegetables come from my garden and my grandparent’s garden.
  2. Dairy products. Strites’ carries milk from a local dairy farm as well as some goat cheese from another farm.  I do know of a local business that makes cheese as well.
  3. Meats. Strites’ carries beef from a local farm.  There are also quite a few other farms that raise chickens and pigs as well.

The most difficult product to find in this area may be pasta.  I have found some local millers that make flour, so I just might have to make my own pasta.  I may also have to find different snacks to eat or make my own.

This area has a lot of major food production factories such as Hershey’s, Turkey Hill, Snyder’s, and Utz.  Obviously, cacao doesn’t grow in Pennsylvania, but Turkey Hill has implemented some local sourcing initiatives.  I can’t find anything about local products being used on the Snyder’s or Utz websites.Cocoa Powder

Becoming a locavore will not be an easy task to implement so I am going to start slowly by finding products that I know are 100% local and I may make exceptions for local businesses that do not necessarily source their products from the immediate area.

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